English II Honors Virtual Work

Week #8--5/11-5/15


Due Friday at 3 p.m.: Read through the questions attached and pick ONE that interests you. Write a thesis statement in response to the question and then use examples from your readings and experiences to support your claim. Your paper should be at least 500 words and should be edited carefully for spelling, punctuation and grammar. This paper must be your original work from your original brain. Please do not consult outside sources, including your peers' papers, because doing so is plagiarism. If you have questions or need help, please come to Office Hours. This paper is worth 200 points, so please work hard on it. :) 


Week #7--5/4-5/8

You have just one assignment this week, but it has several parts. Please read the instructions carefully and come to Office Hours (8:45 Tuesday and Thursday) if you have questions. I have set the due date for Friday at 3 P.M. You will want to turn in your SPACECAT well before deadline to make sure computer issues do not prevent you from meeting the deadline. This assignments will count as a test grade. 
1-Watch the following Ted Talk:
https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-iba-syn&hsimp=yhs-syn&hspart=iba&p=carine+mccandless+Ted+Talk#id=1&vid=5691695a89e48d80213cd174bfb34f65&action=click
2-Complete a SPACECAT of the talk. Make sure to write in complete sentences and to use lots of evidence from the talk in your response. For speaker, for example, you don’t want to write “Carine McCandless.” You want to tell us what you know about her from reading Into the Wild and from what she shares in the talk. Make sure to answer all questions in each category. You will most likely need to watch the talk a second time to really analyze the language.
3-Go to the Into the Wild channel and make a comment or ask a question related to the talk. You may write about how the talk does or does not change your mind about Chris’s choices in Into the Wild or about anything else related to Carine McCandless’s story. Then respond to at least two other students’ comments or questions.

Week #6--4/27-5/1

Study of Into the Wild through the epilogue due Tuesday at 11:59
Complete the last questions on your study guide. Make sure to answer the questions with lots of evidence from the text.

Due Friday at 3:00 P.M.
Response to Epigraph--Study the epigraph from chapter 18. Paraphrase it, and then write an analysis of what the epigraph and the book say about life and death. Your response should be at least 500 words.
OR Study the epigraph and then sign on to the discussion for your class: A1 and A2: Tuesday at 8:45 or B4 Thursday at 8:45. If you choose the discussion, you must turn on your video and contribute to receive credit. I would love to see your faces and hear your ideas!


Week #5—4/20-4/24
Study of Into the Wild Chapters 14-15 due Tuesday at 11:59

Read and write full sentence responses to the questions attached. Make sure to support your responses with textual evidence and with explanation. Students who did the following extra credit assignment last week really enjoyed the movie, so if you have time this week, please take advantage of it: You may earn extra credit by watching the documentary Free Solo and writing a page comparing and contrasting the motivations and experiences of this climber with Christopher McCandless. 

Blended Learning due Friday at 11:59
If you do Achieve 3000, please complete the activities and stretch articles for these two articles:
A Grand, Grand Canyon
Climbing Kilimanjaro
If you have graduated from Achieve 3000, go to CommonLit and do “Conservation as a National Duty.”



Assignments for Week #4--(4/13-4/17)

#1 due Tuesday, 11:59 p.m. Go through Blended Learning to Common Lit. Read and answer assessment questions for the article "The 1972 Andes Flight Disaster," Answer one of the discussion questions in the Into the Wild channel. Then ask a question or make a comment and respond to two peers’ comments.

#2 due Friday, 3 p.m. Study chapters 11-13 of Into the Wild and answer the questions attached. Make sure to write in complete sentences and to use details and examples from the text. You may earn extra credit by watching the documentary Free Solo and writing a page comparing and contrasting the motivations and experiences of this climber with Christopher McCandless. 

Assignments for Week #3--(4/6-4/9)

#1
Due Wednesday, April 8: Read chapters 8-10 of Into the Wild and answer the questions on the study guide for those chapters. To receive full credit, you will want to answer in complete sentences and use evidence from the book in your responses.
Extra Credit:
Read the following epigraph from chapter 8:
“It may, after all, be the bad habit of creative talents to invest themselves in pathological extremes that yield remarkable insights but no durable way of life for those who cannot translate their psychic wounds into significant art or thought.” Theodore Roszak, “In Search of the Miraculous”
Then write a page or so discussing to what extent you feel that is true based on your experiences and observations.

#2 (due Thursday, 4/09 at 3:00 p.m.) Go to Achieve 3000 and choose an article. Do the activity and the stretch article and activity. You are welcome to do as many articles as you like. If you have graduated from Achieve 3000, please read a poem, essay, short story or a novel (or part of a novel) of your choice (consider looking at last week’s recommendations from your peers.), and post a few sentences about it in the recommendations channel. Include the title and author along with your commentary.


Assignments for Week #2 (March 30-April 3)

#1 (due Tuesday, 3/31, at 3:00 p.m.) I hope you are enjoying Into the Wild. Now that you have started reading the book, I want you to step back and think about the themes and ideas presented so far.
Please talk to a friend or family member about the following questions, and then post in the Into the Wild channel a claim or statement about one of the four. Respond to another student’s post while you are there, and tie your comments back to the book if you can. Please use language and references appropriate to the classroom. A great rule of thumb: If you would not say it during a whole class discussion, then you should not write it on the virtual discussion board. Looking forward to hearing your ideas!

1. Our educational system encourages parents and teachers to see children as GPAs, AP and SAT scores.
2. The lives of young people today are overly scripted and supervised.
3. Children inevitably rebel against the values of their parents.
4. People have the right to pursue happiness in whatever way they choose as long as they do no physical harm to those around them.

#2 (due Friday, 4/03 at 3:00 p.m.) In Chapter 4 of Into the Wild, McCandless adopts the perspective shared by many of the transcendentalists that it is OK to disobey the laws of a state or country. Please write a response to the following quote in which you agree, disagree or qualify Thoreau’s statement: Quote:” Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves.” Henry David Thoreau Use your readings, observations and experiences to support your stance. Your response should be approximately a page in length. (500+ words)

#3 (due Friday, 4/03 at 3:00 p.m.) Go to Achieve 3000 and choose an article. Do the activity and the stretch article and activity. You are welcome to do as many articles as you like. If you have graduated from Achieve 3000, please read a poem, essay, short story or a novel (or part of a novel) of your choice, and post a few sentences about it in the recommendations channel. Include the title and author along with your commentary.


Assignments for Week #1 (March 23-27)

#1 Ready to get started?! We will begin quarter 4 with a rhetorical analysis of an article written in response to the current pandemic. Please read the Dan Rather article below and then complete a SPACECAT of it using the attached form. If you can upload your completed form to Teams, go ahead and do so. If not, you may email it to me. Remember to sign in with the answer to an attendance question at least every other day so I know you are with us. 

#2 Please complete all activities for each of the following Achieve 3000 articles: 
"Libraries Have Still Got It!"
"Into the Wild"
The first is a reminder of how reading and other art sustain us in hard times, and the second is about the importance of preserving nature. 

#3 Your last assignment of week #1 is to begin your study of Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild. Nearly all of you checked out this book before spring break. If you do not have it, you can find a link on Focus and read it from there. I am attaching study questions for the entire book so that you may work ahead if you like. You answers to the first seven chapters are due on Monday, March 30. If you would like to use the Student Collaboration channel to share ideas as you read, you may certainly do so. 







English II Honors Make Up Work and Home Learning--Quarter 3

Greetings, students! Hope you are all faring well on your extended spring break. If you have time to get started on your reading for quarter four, go ahead and read the paper copy of Into the Wild you checked out before break or pull up the pdf in the link at right. You can also work on your lexile by going through Blended Learning and doing Achieve 3000 articles of your choice. As you are, we are awaiting word from the district on when we will return to school. Meanwhile, stay healthy and take care in these strange times. Ms. Dvorak

Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6

If you were absent, print a copy of SPACECAT in the files at right. Then complete it for MLK, Jr's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." 

Home Learning: You can start reading Into the Wild over break if you like. We will begin study of it fourth quarter. Have a great break.

Tuesday and Wednesday, March 3 and 4

If you were absent, finish "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" on pages 333+. Then write a page describing King's argumentation in these last lines. 


Friday and Monday, February 28 and March 2

If you were absent, read pages 327-333 of "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" and answer the following questions, using textual evidence to support your responses: 
1) Describe King's counterargument in lines 299-336 to the assertion that the actions off Birmingham's African American community precipitated violence and must be condemned. 
2) Desscribe King's counterargument in line 313-336 in reponse to the counterclaim that African Americans will eventually receive eual rights.
3) Describe the two opposing forces King discusses in lines 340-363. 
4) How does King shift the idea of being "extremeist" from something negative to something positive in lines 384-410?
5) Name the contrasts between what King expected from religious leaders and what actually happened in lines 446-485.


Wednesday and Thursday, February 26 and 27

If you were absent, read through pages 324- 328 of "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Then write a paragraph in response to each of these questions to total at least a a page and a half of writing:
1-How do King's references or allusions to religion in these pages appeal to his readers. Give at least two examples.
2-What distinction does King make between just and unjust laws? 
3-How does King address the counterclaim that African Americans will eventually get equal rights and should follow the laws as they wait? Use details from the text in your response. 




Monday and Tuesday, February 24 and 25

If you were absent, go through Blended Learning to myhrw.com. Read pages 317-324 and write a two-page summary of these pages.

Home Learning: Finish any work from part I of "Letter" for next class. 

Thursday and Friday, February 20 and 21

If you were absent, go to the class website. Pull up the file “How Reading Makes You More Intelligent and Empathetic.” Write a summary of the article (at least a half page), and then write a half page connecting the message of the article to your own reading of Things Fall Apart or any other novel you have read and appreciated.

When you return from your absence, turn in your personal narrative. 


Tuesday and Wednesday, February 18 and 19

Write answers to three of the following questions, using details from the last section of Things Fall Apart in each response:
1. Do you think the novel is meant to be political? What point was the author trying to make? Did he succeed? 
2. Why is the novel so controversial? Do you think the book should be censored or banned? Should it be taught in schools?  
3. What is the role of family and community in this novel? How does it change with the arrival of missionaries?
4. Does the story end the way you expected? How? Why? What point do you think the author was making with the conclusion of the novel? Does you perspective change knowing there is a sequel? 
5. How is religion portrayed in this novel? Do you think the Christian missionaries had a positive or negative impact on the characters?  

Home Learning: Revise and type your narrative essay for next class (the one in which you tell a story about a time you have been treated as an "other," or judged based on only one part of who you are.

Thursday and Friday, February 13 and 14

If you were absent, come to Lunch and Learn when you return to get your classic love poem assignment. 

Home Learning: Finish Things Fall Apart for next class. Your final typed draft of your personal narrative is due the class after next Feb 20/21. You may put your name on it or leave it anonymous. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, February 11 and 12

If you were absent, write a description of 5 interactions between the Ibo people and the Europeans in Part II of Things Fall Apart. Descirbe each interaction, explain  its significance to the plot of the novel, and explain how the event contributes to the development of Okonkwo’s character.

Home Learning for next class: Consider the point Adiche makes in “The Danger of a Single Story.” For next class, write a page telling a story about a time you have been viewed through the lens of a single story and treated as an “other,”  in other words judged based on one aspect of your self (physical, emotional, mental), family, character or interests. Your story can be sad, funny, confounding, etc, but it should be heartfelt. Please type it if you can. If not, use your best handwriting.  If you would like to remain anonymous, you may do so. You will write your name on your paper after it has been shared with several peers.

For class after next (Tuesday and Wednesday), finish the book. 


Friday and Monday, February 7 and 10

If you were absent, write answers to the questions in the following slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1Tw9RN9XTBZYulNsVD_6SibIFNlqCjjh4LYyb6dggCxs/mobilepresent?slide=id.p.

Print a SPACECAT handout from the files at right, or pull it up and write on a separate sheet of paper, and fill it out for Uchendu's speech to Okonkwo on the last three pages of chapter 14 of Things Fall Apart.

Home Learning: Finish part II of Things Fall Apart (chapters 14-19) by Tuesday/Wednesday.

Wednesday and Thursday, February 5 and 6

If you were absent, or if you did not finish your four Achieve 3000 articles for February, do those by the end of the week: "Grandmas for Change," "A Win-Win," "140-Year-Old Letter," and "Book Fair in Somalia."

Finish part II of TFA for Tuesday/Wednesday (Feb. 11 and 12)


Monday and Tuesday, February 3 and 4

If you were absent, write a full body paragraph in response to ONE of the following questions. Your answer should be at least a half page and should include a topic sentence; details from the novel in the form of summary, paraphrase or quote; and interpretation of that evidence.
What elements of Ibo society do you find admirable?
Which element of Ibo society does Achebe seem most critical of?
How does Nwoye seem both drawn to and repulsed by the society in which he lives?

Begin this month’s Achieve 3000 articles—activity only:
“Grandmas for Change”
“140-Year-Old Letter”
“A Win-Win”
“Book Fair in Somalia”

Home Learning: Finish section II of the book for Friday/Monday. (chapters 14-19)

Thursday and Friday, January 30 and 31

If you were absent, write an essay in which you compare and contrast Okonkwo and Obierka. Make sure to use references to at least three sections of the book as you explore their contrasts. 

Home Learning: Review chapters 1-13.


Tuesday and Wednesdsay, January 28 and 29

If you were absent, see me the day you return to get your handout on proverbs in Things Fall Apart. 

Home Learning: Read chapters 7-13 of Things Fall Apart for next class. Remember that the link to the pdf of the book is at right. 

Friday and Monday, January 24 and 27

If you were absent, you will make up your reading check for chapters 1-6 at home by doing the following assignment: 
Write an essay in which you take a claim from the TED Talk "The Danger of a Single Story" and show how the first six chapters of Things Fall Apart support that claim. You will need to use details from at least three sections of the book in your response. If you need help with the assignment, please come to Lunch and Learn. I am open first half Monday, Tuesday and Thursday of next week. 

Home Learning: Read chapters 7-13 of Things Fall Apart for the class after next (Thursday for B day and Friday for A day)

Wednesday and Thursday, January 22 and 23

If you were absent, watch the Ted Talk "The Danger of a Single Story," and write a one-page response to it.

Home Learning: A reminder that all Macbeth essays are due by the end of Lunch and Learn on Thursday.


Friday and Tuesday, January 17 and 21

If you were absent, go to my.hrw through Blended Learning. Read "Without Title" on page 39-40 and answer all questions on page 40.

Home Learning: For the class after next, read the first  six chapters of Things Fall Apart. Keep your character chart updated with each new character, and write a one to two sentence summary of each chapter.  I will collect your summaries and check your character chart on Friday, Jan. 24 and Monday, Jan. 27.


Wednesday and Thursday, January 15 and 16
Monday and Tuesday, January 13 and 14


If you were absent, come to Lunch and Learn the day you return to finish your essay on Macbeth. We will begin our next book, Things Fall Apart, on Friday. 

Home Learning: If you have not yet finished your essay, you will have four more Lunch and Learn sessions to do so--Thrusday this week;  Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of next week. No essays will be accepted after Thursday, 1/23. If you want to rewrite your essay, you must do so during Lunch and Learn sometime between now and January 31. No essay rewrites will be accepted after January 31.

Thursday and Friday, January 9 and 10

If you were absent, you must come to Lunch and Learn Monday to begin writing your essay on Macbeth. We planned today and will write the essay next class. 


Tuesday and Wednesday, January 7 and 8

If you were absent, come to Lunch and Learn the day you return to take your quarter 2 PMA.

Home Learning: All one-pagers for Macbeth must be turned in by Monday to receive credit. You can work on these during Lunch and Learn or at home.

AP Language and Composition Virtual Learning--Quarter 4

Week #8--(5/11-5/15)

We will have "class" Tuesday as a last review of rhetorical analysis. Please print the prompt and sign in at 9:30 a.m. If you cannot, follow directions for the assignment, which is due by midnight Tuesday. On Thursday, we will go over practical matters for the AP test next Wednesday. Please email me if you cannot access these lessons--I am not putting links here this week because there are so many. :) 

Week #7—(5/04-5/08)
FRQ Due 11:45 p.m. Tuesday
For this assignment, you will go to AP Classroom and pull up the FRQ April, which is a free-response rhetorical analysis from the College Board. To help you with timing, I have set the timer for 45 minutes. Please make sure that you take the test well before 11 p.m. on Tuesday so that you do not run into issues with your computer that make it impossible for you to meet the deadline. Before you pull up the test, print the rhetorical analysis essay plan so that you have it in front of you as you write. Remember that you will be able to use notes on the actual essay May 20, and if you’ve practiced with the plan, it will be a valuable resource for you.  
Please come to Office Hours Tuesday if you have any questions about the rhetorical analysis essay or the AP Classroom platform and Thursday if you would like to go over responses. I will go over notes for this particular essay at that time.


Week #6—(4/27-5/01)
AP Lang Webinar--Choose Your Adventure due Friday by 3 p.m..
See attached handout for instructions. This assignment will take a couple of hours, so give yourself plenty of time so that you meet the deadline.

Due Tuesday 11:59
Rhetorical Analysis of TED Talk
Use the rhetorical handout plan attached to write an outline for an analysis of ONE of the TED Talks listed below. Make sure to include an introduction, topic sentence with action verbs, bullet pointed evidence, and a conclusion. When you finish, turn in your outline, and go to the gender channel to make a claim or ask a question about the issue studied and comment on two other students’ claims or questions.
Chimanda Adiche’s “Why We Should All Be Feminists”
https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_we_should_all_be_feminists
Jackson Katz’s “Violence against Women -- It's a Men's Issue”
https://www.ted.com/talks/jackson_katz_violence_against_women_it_s_a_men_s_issue
Emily Quinn’s “The Way We Think About Biological Sex is Wrong”
https://www.ted.com/talks/emily_quinn_the_way_we_think_about_biological_sex_is_wrong


Week #5 (4/20-4/24)

Essay Review—Due Tuesday, 4/21 at 11:59

*This assignment will count as a quiz grade.
Reread the rhetorical analysis handout, and then write an evaluation of your own essay from last week (the one on The Handmaid’s Tale or Their Eyes Were Watching God).
1-Explain how your introduction meets the characteristics described. If it does not, rewrite it so that it does, and include your rewrite with your response.
2-Evaluate how well the topic sentences demonstrate a line of reasoning by tying back to the thesis. If your topic sentences fall short, please rewrite them and include them with your response.
3-Evaluate how well your conclusion meets the characteristics described. If you see room for improvement, rewrite it with your response.
4-What element/s of writing are you proud of in this essay?

A few notes:
The best essays:
Followed the directions in the prompt and had a thesis connecting a specific passage to one of the book’s themes.
Followed the pattern described on the handout with topic sentences connected very tightly to an analysis of how a section of the passage develops a theme. If you decide to organize your essay around rhetorical strategies, make sure to use verbs of analysis described on the handout. Listing devices in your thesis (anaphora, simile, etc) limits your scope and leads to an awkward tone.
Were edited. (You will be able to use spell check and grammar check on your AP exam May 20.  You don’t want to spend more than a couple of minutes editing, but you want to capitalize proper nouns, use the correct spelling of the author’s name, use the author’s last name, etc.)

Rhetorical Analysis of Albright Speech at Mount Holyoke College Due 4/24, 11:59 p.m.
Use the handout attached (rhetorical analysis plan) to take notes on the prompt, which you can find on page 10 of this PDF: https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/ap/pdf/ap18-frq-english-language.pdf
Now watch the following video lesson: AP English Language: Crafting a Thesis for a Rhetorical Analysis Essay
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPJGDf0LmOA
Finally, write an outline of your response to the prompt, including an introductory paragraph, outline of body paragraphs (topic sentences and notes on evidence), and a conclusion. Turn in your outline.


Week #4 (4/13-4/17)

Due by 3 P.M. Friday, April 17

Rhetorical Analysis Test on The Handmaid’s Tale OR Their Eyes Were Watching God
Please choose a scene from the novel you read, and follow the instructions on the Rhetorical Analysis for Timed Writings handout to write an essay describing how the strategies the author or speaker uses in that passage to develop a theme of the novel.
Remember that you can determine theme by brainstorming abstract words and then asking yourself what the text suggests about one of those abstractions. Horton Hears a Who, for example, is about, among other things, equality. The book demonstrates through the main character’s determination to find a miniscule being that “a person is a person, no matter how small.” A rhetorical analysis might center on the scene in which the kangaroo admonishes Horton to stop talking with people who don’t exist, and in response Horton exhorts the major of Whoville to gather everyone to prove their existence. Seuss uses rhyme, emotive language and dramatic illustrations to create a tone of urgency that underscores the importance of each being in the grand scheme of life.
Please label your test with a one-two sentence description of the scene with page numbers, and please type your response and turn it in to Teams. Your essay will be graded using the 6-point rhetorical analysis prompt.


Week #3 (4/6-4/9)

#1 (due Thursday, 4/9)

Please complete a thorough SPACECAT analysis and an outline with thesis, topic sentences and notes on evidence for an essay on the 2014 Abigail Adams rhetorical analysis essay prompt on page 9 of the following test: https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap14_frq_english_language.pdf.
Before you complete the assignment, you may watch one or more of the five videos provided by the College Board to deepen your understanding of rhetorical analysis. These videos by Emily Valaitis take your through an analysis of the prompt above. They are most effective if you print the prompt or open it on a second screen or device so that you can annotate as you listen. These videos are not required, but they will likely help you to improve your score on the exam.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_B5RdauS0w&list=PLoGgviqq4845w6_VxQLtAmVypmSMtTd0r&index=1
If you would like to work together analyzing the prompt, please read it before Tuesday and then sign in to our office hours where we can work on SPACECAT together. On Thursday, you may sign in, and we can work on the outline together. If you are not in the live meeting, all work must be done independently.
Remember that any late work must be emailed to me with an explanation of how circumstances beyond your control prevented you from meeting the deadline.

#2—(due Monday, April 13)
Continue studying your novel. Guiding questions for close reading are attached. Office Hours on Tuesday next week will be for discussion of Their Eyes Were Watching God, Thursday for discussion of The Handmaid’s Tale with a test due Friday.



Week #2 (3/30-4/3)

#1  are going to focus this last quarter on texts related to gender. Your first assignment has several parts:
  • Please begin by talking to a friend or family member about what people mean when they tell someone to be a real man. Then talk to that same person about what it means to be a good man. (Think of what people say at funerals about good men they honor.) Now talk about how our ideas of being a real man and being a good man do or do not differ and why.
  • Watch these TED Talks on Masculinity: Justin Baldoni: Why I'm done trying to be "man enough” and “A Call to Men” by Tony Porter. As you watch, consider the rhetorical situation and the appeals each man makes to achieve his purpose.
  • Finally, go to the unit gender channel and share the insights your gained from your discussion, your viewing and your reading from your novel. You may raise questions, respond to others’ comment and/or make claims about something you learned. Make every effort to “come to class” on Tuesday or Thursday this week (9:30-10:45) to discuss your ideas during our meeting time.

#2—due Friday by 3:00 p.m.
Do MCQ #7 in AP Classroom

#3—due Monday, April 13
Continue studying your novel.


Week #1 (3/23-3/27)

#1 We will begin our virtual lessons with a rhetorical analysis of an article written in response to the current pandemic. Please read the Dan Rather article accessible at right and then complete a SPACECAT of it using the attached form. If you can upload your completed form to Teams, go ahead and do so. If not, you may email it to me. Remember to sign in with the answer to an attendance question at least every other day so I know you are with us. 
#2 Go to AP Classroom and complete the Unit 6 MCQ progress check. The College Board is offering review sessions, so check your page for resources. 
#3 Please use the guiding questions attached to do a close read of ONE of the following books related to the unit theme--gender studies: Margaret Atwood's dystopic novel The Handmaid's Tale or Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. (If you have not already purchased the book, you may be able to borrow it from the online public library.) You may use the questions to annotate your text, to take notes or to discuss with a peer or peers as you read. You will have three weeks to study the novel, with a final due date of Monday, April 13.  I would suggest dividing the novel into three sections and giving yourself a certain number of chapters per day or week. I look forward to hearing your ideas about these two modern classics!







Make Up and Home Learning for Quarter 3

Hello, juniors! I hope you are doing well and staying healthy during this extended break. So far, we have heard little from the College Board about the dates of the AP exam, but we are still expecting them to occur sometime in May. Hoping that in the near future we will get some clarity on how the rest of the semester will play out. Meanwhile, you can do two helpful things to fill your time while you are in social isolation: 1) Read The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood or Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston OR BOTH! They are great books that give different perspectives on our Unit IV theme of gender studies. 2) Work on AP Classroom to do Multiple Choice Progress Checks. I have openned up the rest of the tests along with the answers. Take care of yourselves, and let me know if you have questions. See you soon, I hope. Ms. Dvorak

Thursday and Friday, March 5 and 6

No make up work possible. Have a great break. Read something you enjoy. Our next book is Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, so go ahead and borrow or buy a copy and read it over break if you know that you will be busy after break.

Wednesday, March 4 (A Day)

If you were absent, do a rhetorical analysis of the poem by William Stafford titled "Holcomb, Kansas." (You can find it online.) Use the Spacecat rhetorical analysis form at right to organize your ideas. 


Monday and Tuesday, March 2 and 3

If you were absent, you can earn your socratic seminar grade by writing responses to the following questions:

Whose tragedy is it?
How much is the book a saga of the American Dream meeting up with the American Nightmare (the American Dream gone bad)?
Why do you think In Cold Blood was such a best-selling, prominent book?
Does Capote succeed in revealing the humanity of the killers, especially Perry Smith? What effect does this have on your reading of the book?
Does Capote succeed in explaining, on some level, this random, seemingly inexplicable crime?

You do not need to write in essay form. Aim for a couple of pages total.

Thursday and Friday, February 27 and 28

If you were absent, write at least a page describing how the last section of In Cold Blood serves as a criticism of the death penalty. Come to Lunch and Learn Monday to make up your timed writing.

Home Learning: Bring your novel next class.

Tuesday and Wednesdsay, February 25 and 26

If you were absent, print the 2002 free response question #1 from the College Board website. Annotate it by dividing it into three or four sections and doing a says/does analysis of each section. Then write an introductory paragraph for an essay in response to the prompt.

Home Learning: Finish your study of In Cold Blood by next class. 

Friday and Monday, February 21 and 24

If you were absent, watch two presidential inauguration speeches of your choice on YouTube. Compare and contrast each using Joliffe's rhetorical framework.

Home Learning: Finish In Cold Blood by Feb. 27/28.


Wednesday and Thursday, February 19 and 20

If you were absent, wtite an essay in which you argue your position on to what extent section III of In Cold Blood provides and "answer" to the townspeople's concerns. Make sure use textual evidence in your response.

Home Learning: Finish In Cold Blood by Feb 27/28.

Tuesday, February 18 

If you were absent, go to the College Board website (link at right) and find the 2017 free response question #2 rhetorical analysis prompt. Divide the text into three parts, and do a says/does analysis of each part. After you have finished, annotate the passage for elements of language that help the speaker reach the intended audience.

Home Learning: Finish part III of ICB by next class. 


Friday, February 14 (A Day)

No make up work possible

Home Learning: Finish part III of In Cold Blood by next class.

Thursday, February 13 (B Day)

If you were absent, listen to Robert Kennedy's speech ( https://www.npr.org/2018/03/31/598503617/remembering-robert-f-kennedys-speech-after-martin-luther-king-s-assassination). Write an introductory paragraph for a rhetorical analysis of the speech, and outline your analysis.

Home Learning: Finish your study of Part III of In Cold Blood by Wednesday/Thursday.

Wednesdsay, February 12 (A Day)

If you were absent, listen to Robert Kennedy's speech ( https://www.npr.org/2018/03/31/598503617/remembering-robert-f-kennedys-speech-after-martin-luther-king-s-assassination). Write an introductory paragraph for a rhetorical analysis of the speech, and outline your analysis.

Do the same with Maria Stewart’s speech (2005 form B on the College Board website--link at right) 

Home Learning: Study part III of In Cold Blood for Feb. 19/20.


Monday and Tuesday, February 10 and 11

If you were absent, write an essay in response to the following prompt: Many critics of In Cold Blood assert that Capote's use of language in the book shows a bias in favor of Perry. Write an essay in which you argue the extent to which Capote shows Perry as a victim and Dick as a cold blooded killer in part II of the book. Use specific examples of both content and language choices in your essay. (This essay covers both your reading check and the class exercise.)

Home Learning: Study part III of In Cold Blood--due Feb. 19/20. 


Thursday and Friday, February 6 and 7

If you were absent, do MCQ #5 on AP Classroom. 

Home Learning: Finish Part II of In Cold Blood for Monday/Tuesday.

Tuesday and Wednesday, February 4 and 5

If you were absent, come to Lunch and Learn the day you return to take a mulitple choice practice test on excerpts from ICB.

Home Learning: Study part II of ICB by Feb. 10/11.

Friday and Monday, January 31 and February 3

If you were absent, choose three elements of the Southern Gothic listed below, and for each, write a paragraph describing how the first section of In Cold Blood reflects that element.

Characteristics of Southern Gothic Literature include the following:
Explorations of the subconscious
A good versus evil polarity in characters
A focus on the grotesque—characters and situations both repulsive and compelling
A focus on mental illness, on damaged and delusional characters
A focus on groups who have been ostracized from mainstream Southern culture
Use of setting and atmosphere to elicit emotional response from readers
Imprisonment, literal and metaphorical
Situations involving violence, death and terror

Home Learning: Study part II of In Cold Blood for February 10/11.

Wednesday and Thursday, January 29 and 30

Please see a classmate to get notes on the synthesis essay and on the Southern Gothic genre.

Home Learning: Read the first section of In Cold Blood for January 31 and February 3


Monday and Tuesday, January 27 and 28

No make up work possible. Turn in your This I Believe essay when you return.

Home Learning: Begin reading In Cold Blood by next class. Finish section I (about 80 pages) by Friday/Monday.

Thursday and Friday, January 23 and 24

If you were absent, come to Lunch and Learn the day you return to make up your synthesis essay.

Home Learning: Two copies of your revised and typed "This I Believe" essay is due next class. You will need In Cold Blood in class on Wednesday/Thursday and will need to have the first section (about 80 pages) read by 1/31 and 2/3.


Tuesday and Wednesday, January 21 and 22

If you were absent, come to Lunch and Learn to plan the essay you will write next class.

Home Learning: Final "This I Believe" essays due Jan. 27/28. Need In Cold Blood in class Jan. 29/30 and first section read by Jan. 31/Feb. 3. 

Thursday and Friday, January 16 and 17

Google and read Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal." Write an analysis of what Swift is satirizing and how he uses the following elements of satire in his essay: 
Satire is a text or performance that exposes or attacks human vice, foolishness, or stupidity, generally through use of one or more of the following techniques:
Exaggeration, or Hyperbole--enlarging, increasing, or representing something beyond normal bounds so that it becomes ridiculous and its faults can be seen.
Understatement, or Meiosis--deliberately understating the obvious or writing as if it is less significant than it is. 
Incongruity--presenting things that are out of place or are absurd in relation to their surroundings. 
Reversal--presenting the opposite of the normal order (e.g., the order of events, hierarchical order).
Parody--imitating the techniques and/or style of some person, place, or thing.
Comic Irony--stating one thing while meaning another. It is an application of verbal irony used with humorous intent. 

Home Learning: Final "This I Believe" essays due Jan. 27/28. Need In Cold Blood in class Jan. 29/30 and first section read by Jan. 31/Feb. 3. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, January 14 and 15

No make up work possible.

Home Learning: Revise and type your essay--two copies due in class Jan. 23 and 24.


Friday and Monday, January 10 and 13

If you were absent, write of draft of the essay described below: 

This I Believe Essay Writing Assignment (adapted from ThisIBelieve.org)

Tell a story about you: Be specific. Take your belief out of the ether and ground it in the events that have shaped your core values. Consider moments when belief was formed or tested or changed. Think of your own experience, work, and family, and tell of the things you know that no one else does. Your story need not be heart-warming or gut-wrenching—it can even be funny—but it should be real. Make sure your story ties to the essence of your daily life philosophy and the shaping of your beliefs.
Be brief: Your statement should be between 500 and 600 words.
Name your belief: If you can’t name it in a sentence or two, your essay might not be about belief. Also, rather than writing a list, consider focusing on one core belief.
Be positive: Write about what you do believe, not what you don’t believe. Avoid statements of religious dogma, preaching, or editorializing.
Be personal: Make your essay about you; speak in the first person. Avoid speaking in the editorial “we.” Tell a story from your own life; this is not an opinion piece about social ideals. Write in words and phrases that are comfortable for you to speak.
Experiment with language: Use at least three rhetorical and literary devices. (anaphora, simile, personification, etc.)

Draft due: January 14/15


Thursday, January 9 (B Day)

If you were absent, finish and turn in your SOAPStone of Chabon's article "What is the Point?" Then 
Listen to at least three stories on the “This I Believe” website. Write down the title of each and follow with a brief analysis (a good paragraph for each) of what makes the story resonate with readers. 

Home Learning: Get a copy of In Cold Blood by Jan. 18.

Wednesday, January 8 (A day only)

If you were absent, print a copy of the SOAPStone handout in the files at right. Then watch Simon Sinek's talk by copying and pasting the link into your browser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hER0Qp6QJNU&feature=youtu.be

Do a SOAPStone analysis of the talk. Then read "What's the Point?" by Michael Chabon and do a SOAPStone analysis of i

A day only: Listen to at least three stories on the “This I Believe” website. Write down the title of each and follow with a brief analysis (a good paragraph for each) of what makes the story resonate with readers. 
Get a copy of In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. You will need it in class January 17/18.

Tuesday and Wednesday, January 7 (B day)

If you were absent, print a copy of the SOAPStone handout in the files at right. Then watch Simon Sinek's talk by copying and pasting the link into your browser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hER0Qp6QJNU&feature=youtu.be

Do a SOAPStone analysis of the talk. Then read "What's the Point?" by Michael Chabon and do a SOAPStone analysis of it.

Home Learning: Get a copy of In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. You will need it in class January 17/18.